Area Code 736

    area code

  • A three-digit number that identifies one of the telephone service regions into which the US, Canada, and certain other countries are divided and that is dialed when calling from one area to another
  • A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunications to allocate telephone numbers to subscribers and to route telephone calls in a telephone network. A closed numbering plan, such as found in North America, imposes a fixed total length to numbers.
  • The Chinese Telephone Code Plan is the way to group telephone numbers in the mainland of the People’s Republic of China. Land lines and mobile phones follow different systems: land lines use area codes, while mobile phones do not.
  • a number usually of 3 digits assigned to a telephone area as in the United States and Canada

    736

  • * The scholar-priest Roben invites Shinsho to give lectures on the Avatamsaka Sutra at Kinshosen-ji (later Todai-ji); this event is considered to be the roots of the Kegon school of Buddhism founded in Japan.
  • 700 (seven hundred) is the natural number following 699 and preceding 701.

area code 736

Las Vegas Airport

Las Vegas Airport
FAA INFORMATION EFFECTIVE 23 SEPTEMBER 2010
Location
FAA Identifier: LAS
Lat/Long: 36-04-48.2000N / 115-09-08.1000W
36-04.803333N / 115-09.135000W
36.0800556 / -115.1522500
(estimated)
Elevation: 2181 ft. / 664.8 m (surveyed)
Variation: 15E (1980)
From city: 5 miles S of LAS VEGAS, NV
Time zone: UTC -7 (UTC -8 during Standard Time)
Zip code: 89119

Airport Operations
Airport use: Open to the public
Activation date: 01/1947
Sectional chart: LAS VEGAS
Control tower: yes
ARTCC: LOS ANGELES CENTER
FSS: RENO FLIGHT SERVICE STATION
NOTAMs facility: LAS (NOTAM-D service available)
Attendance: CONTINUOUS
Wind indicator: lighted
Segmented circle: no
Lights: DUSK-DAWN
Beacon: white-green (lighted land airport)
ROTG BCN NOT VISIBLE 115 TO 240 DEGS SE TO SW FROM ATCT.
Fire and rescue: ARFF index E
International operations: customs landing rights airport
LANDING RIGHTS AIRPORT: CUSTOMS AVBL TO GA ACFT
0800-2200, ALL OTHER TIMES PPR CALL 702-261-5539.

Airport Communications
UNICOM: 122.95
WX ASOS: PHONE 702-736-1416
LAS VEGAS GROUND: 121.1(E OF RY 01R/19L) 121.9(W OF RY 01R/19L) 254.3(W OF RY 01L/19R) 270.8(E OF RY 01R/19L)
LAS VEGAS TOWER: 118.75(RY 01L/19R, 01R/19L) 119.9(RY 07L/25R, 07R/25L) 257.8
LAS VEGAS APPROACH: 125.025 379.15
LAS VEGAS DEPARTURE: 125.02 NORTH 125.9 SOUTH 307.25 SOUTH 379.15 NORTH
CLEARANCE DELIVERY: 118.0 379.95
CLASS B: 118.4(E OF INTERSTATE 15; S OF 080 R 125.02(280-360) 125.02(360-080) 125.9(W OF INTERSTATE 15; S OF 280 R 353.7(E OF INTERSTATE 15; S OF 080 R 353.7(W OF INTERSTATE 15; S OF 280 R 379.15(280-360) 379.15(360-080)
D-ATIS: 132.4(ARR/DEP) 702-736-0950
EMERG: 121.5 243.0
RAMP CON: 124.4(TERMINALS A; B; C & CHARTER IN 127.9 D GATES AND CARGO RAMP 129.175 A, B, C GATES AND CHARTER IN
VFR FINAL APCH: 120.45
WX ASOS at HND (6 nm S): 120.775 (702-614-4537)
WX ASOS at VGT (8 nm N): 118.05 (702-648-6633)
WX AWOS-3 at BVU (16 nm SE): 118.475 (702-293-1532)

RAMP CON (1 OF 2): OPS ALL TERMINAL GATES AND CARGO RAMP CONTROLLED BY DEPT OF AVIATION 1400-1000Z. ALL ACFT CTC RAMP CONTROL ON FREQ 124.4 FOR OPS AT A,B,C GATES AND CHARTER INTL GATES, CTC RAMP CONTROL 127.9 FOR OPS AT D GATES AND CARGO RAMP PRIOR TO ENTERING RAMP OR PUSHING BACK FROM GATE OR PARKING SPOT.
RAMP CON (2 OF 2): FROM 1000-1400Z CTC GND CON ON FREQ 121.1 FOR OPS AT ALL GATES AND CARGO RAMP.
ASR-8 ELEV 2060.8 FT. CPME BLD 355944.7205N – 1145150.1338W CPME QAM 361912.8835N – 1145555.5164W CPME QDS 355339.5752N – 1152946.1797W CPME QMP 355721.8619N – 1152944.3103W
Nearby radio navigation aids
VOR radial/distance VOR name Freq Var
LAS at field LAS VEGAS VORTAC 116.90 15E
BLDr275/14.9 BOULDER CITY VORTAC 116.70 15E

Airport Services
Fuel available: 100 100LL JET-A1+
Parking: hangars and tiedowns
Airframe service: MAJOR
Powerplant service: MAJOR
Bottled oxygen: HIGH
Bulk oxygen: HIGH/LOW

Runway Information
Runway 7L/25R
Dimensions: 14510 x 150 ft. / 4423 x 46 m
Surface: asphalt/porous friction courses, in good condition
Weight bearing capacity: Single wheel: 23.0
Double wheel: 220.0
Double tandem: 633.0
Dual double tandem: 877.0

Runway edge lights: high intensity
RUNWAY 7L RUNWAY 25R
Latitude: 36-04.581993N 36-04.584403N
Longitude: 115-10.211407W 115-07.265970W
Elevation: 2179.4 ft. 2032.9 ft.
Gradient: 1.1% DOWN 1.9% UP
Traffic pattern: left left
Runway heading: 075 magnetic, 090 true 255 magnetic, 270 true
Displaced threshold: 2139 ft. 1397 ft.
Declared distances: TORA:14510 TODA:15099 ASDA:14099 LDA:11966 TORA:14510 TODA:15155 ASDA:14155 LDA:12755
Markings: precision, in good condition nonprecision, in good condition
Visual slope indicator: 4-light PAPI on left (3.00 degrees glide path) 4-light PAPI on left (3.00 degrees glide path)
Approach lights: MALSR: 1,400 foot medium intensity approach lighting system with runway alignment indicator lights
Runway end identifier lights: no no
Touchdown point: yes, no lights yes, no lights
Instrument approach: ILS/DME
Obstructions: 25 ft. hangar, 200 ft. from runway, 500 ft. left of centerline
APCH RATIO 50:1 TO DSPLCD THR. none

Runway 7R/25L
Dimensions: 10526 x 150 ft. / 3208 x 46 m
Surface: concrete/grooved, in excellent condition
Weight bearing capacity: Single wheel: 23.0
Double wheel: 220.0
Double tandem: 633.0
Dual double tandem: 914.0

Runway edge lights: high intensity
RUNWAY 7R RUNWAY 25L
Latitude: 36-04.417623N 36-04.419403N
Longitude: 115-09.685993W 115-07.549387W
Elevation: 2157.0 ft. 2048.3 ft.
Gradient: 1.1% DOWN 0.9% UP
Traffic pattern: left left
Runway heading: 075 magnetic, 090 true 255 magnetic, 270 true
Markings: nonprecision, in good condition precision, in good condition
Visual slope indicator: 4-light PAPI on left (3.00 degrees glide path) 4-light PAPI on left (3.00 degrees glide path)
Approach lights: MALSF: 1,400 foot medium intensity appro

Jamaica FLAG

Jamaica FLAG
Jamaica is a Caribbean island nation of the Greater Antilles. The island is 234 kilometres (145 mi) in length and as much as 80 kilometres (50 mi) in width . It is located about 145 kilometres (90 mi) south of Cuba, and 190 kilometres (120 mi) west of the island of Hispaniola (Haiti & Dominican Republic).

The island of Jamaica is home to the Blue Mountains inland, and is surrounded by a narrow coastal plain. Most major towns and cities are located on the coast. Chief towns and cities include the capital Kingston, Portmore, Spanish Town, Mandeville, Ocho Rios, Port Antonio, and Montego Bay.

The climate in Jamaica is tropical, with hot and humid weather, although higher inland regions have a more temperate climate. Jamaica lies in the hurricane belt of the Atlantic Ocean; as a result, the island sometimes experiences significant storm damage. Hurricanes Charlie and Gilbert hit Jamaica directly in 1951 and 1988, respectively, causing major damage, destruction, and many deaths. In the 2000s, hurricanes Ivan and Dean also brought severe weather to the island.

Its indigenous Arawakan-speaking Taino inhabitants named the island Xaymaca, meaning the Land of Wood and Water, or the Land of Springs. Formerly a Spanish possession known as Santiago, it later became the British West Indies Crown colony of Jamaica. It is the third most populous anglophone country in the Americas, after the United States and Canada.

The original Arawak and possibly Taino people from South America first settled on the island between 4000 and 1000 BC. Although some claim they became virtually extinct following contact with Europeans, others claim that some survived for a while. There is little trace remainingof the Arawak culture.

Christopher Columbus claimed Jamaica for Spain after first landing there in 1494. Columbus’ probable landing point was Dry Harbour, now called Discovery Bay. The Spanish were forcibly evicted by the English at Ocho Rios. However, it was not until 1655 at Tower Isle that the British took over Jamaica. The Spaniard Don Arnoldo de Yassi kept Tower Hill from the English for five years, before escaping to Cuba. The site of his departure was fittingly Runaway Bay.

Under British rule, and achieved through extensive use of imported enslaved African labourers, Jamaica became one of the world’s leading sugar-exporting nations. After the abolition of the slave trade, the British imported Indian and Chinese workers as indentured servants in the early 1800s to supplement the labour pool. Descendants of such Asian indentured servants continue to reside in Jamaica today.

By the beginning of the 19th century, Jamaica’s heavy reliance on slavery resulted in blacks (Africans) outnumbering whites (Europeans) by a ratio of almost 20 to 1. Even though England had out-lawed the importation of slaves, slaves were still smuggled into the colonies.

The Rastafari movement was founded in Jamaica. This Back to Africa movement believes that Haile Selassie of Ethiopia was God incarnate, the returned black messiah, come to take the lost Twelve Tribes of Israel back to live with him in Holy Mount Zion in a world of perfect peace, love and harmony. Bob Marley, a convert to the faith, spread the message of Rastafari to the world. There are now estimated to be more than a million Rastafarians throughout the world.

Though a small nation, Jamaica is rich in culture, and has a strong global presence. The musical genres reggae, ska, mento, rocksteady, dub, and, more recently, dancehall and ragga all originated in the island’s vibrant popular urban recording industry. Jamaica also played an important role in the development of punk rock, through reggae and ska. Reggae has also influenced American rap music, as they both share their roots as rhythmic, African styles of music.

Motto: Out of many, one people
Anthem: Jamaica, Land We Love
Royal anthem: God Save the Queen

Capital: (and largest city) Kingston, 17°59?N, 76°48?W

Official languages: English
Recognised regional languages: Jamaican Patois

Ethnic groups 90.0% Black,
1.5% East Indian,
0.4% White,
7.3% Multiracial

Demonym: Jamaican

Government Parliamentary democracy and Constitutional monarchy
– Monarch Elizabeth II
– Governor-General Kenneth Hall
– Prime Minister Bruce Golding

Independence
– from the United Kingdom 6 August 1962

Area
– Total 10,991 km? (166th), 4,244 ) sq mi
– Water (%) 1.5

Population
– July 2005 estimate 2,651,000 (138th)
– Density 252/km? (49th), 653/sq mi

GDP (PPP) 2005 estimate
– Total $11.69 billion (131st)
– Per capita $4,300 (114th)

GDP (nominal) 2005 estimate
– Total $9.730 billion (101st)
– Per capita $3,658 (79th)

Gini (2000) 37.9 (medium)
HDI (2005) ^ 0.736 (medium) (101st)
Currency: Jamaican dollar (JMD)
Time zone: (UTC-5)
Internet TLD: .jm
Calling code: +1 876

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